27
Feb 13

We Are All Videographers Q&A with Nunnie

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WAAV visits Nunnie’s World.

We are the documentarians, the standard bearers of nightlife’s long gone and almost forgotten. I wonder had Toulouse-Lautrec been alive today, would his world be unveiled in 24fps and on a Canon. - TVG

I met Nunnie sometime around ’07-’08 during the heyday of documenting the nightlife scene in New York. During his visit we spoke about those times like old soldiers reminiscing about their tours. We talked about old friends, memorable moments and how things have changed. This Far Rockaway native might be only 26, but I was quickly reminded that nightlife years are like dog years when he confessed that in a world where youth is a virtue, there are times when he feels like an old timer. I guess if you do this long enough we all reach a point where the dog years creep up on us. Sometimes it seems that documenting youthful exuberance bestows that virtue on the documentarian, an artistic roadmap to our very own Fountain of Youth.

As videographers, photographers, bloggers and promoters, we all play a small part in perpetuating the legacy of nightlife in New York City, and Nunnie has more than just a passing interest in each one of these arts. Nunnie has shot video for the likes of Swizz Beats, WESC, Adeen and a dozen other brands, performers and events. He also shoots narrative pieces and somehow still finds time to promote “Friday Night With Your Host Nunnie” at Sway. Nunnie is definitely doing his part to keep the legacy alive.

So Nunnie, how long have you been shooting?

If you count school, since 2006. I’ve been shooting mofo’s ever since, and I don’t plan on stopping anytime soon.

What is your primary camera?

Good old Canon 7D. I acquired it back in 2011 as a gift. One of the best investments someone made on me in my life – thank you mom ;-)

What is your favorite city to shoot in?

New York City hands down, but Cali is a close second, like very close. Then there is Mexico. I love to vacation out there, and shooting on the beautiful beaches and land helps too.

If you had one historical event or figure you could shoot or interview, who would it be?

To pick just one is a very difficult thing to do, but if I had to pick someone it would have to be Ted Bundy.  I know crazy right, but you have to think about it, he was your everyday All-American guy, who killed so many. To get into the mind of such a deranged person would be fucking awesome.

What do you love most about videography?

How I can take an idea out of my mind and manifest it into something amazing. When you create a video that video can inspire millions, and that’s a beautiful thing.

What is your other passion?

I have to say photography, acting, and taking long walks to nowhere. I love to just walk everywhere especially when it is cold out. No one else is out so I feel like Will Smith from I am Legend, while I walk the earth alone with my dog.

What is your favorite video on Vimeo or YouTube?

This may sound corny for me to say but favorite would have to be a New Pop video back in ’08. It’s the one you did when Texas (Former New Pop partner) is talking in the beginning and the naked white dude walks up to her (The Danger “Dubai” Party). Oh and the Retro Kids performed. Also you guys were out until 6 or 7am. That video changed my life on many different levels, the shooting style, the great use of music, the shots were so fucking amazing, no bullshit, I watched that video at least 1000 times. It was like I was taking a look at so many different personalities in my own back yard that I had no idea even existed. So thank you for that brother.

You’re welcome. That was a fun night. Do you have a website?

Nunniesworld.com

Thank you Nunnie.

If you are interested in being a part of the WAAV project and you’re in the NYC area drop us an email.


22
Feb 13

How Quickly Should You Respond To Your Clients Inquiries?

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How quickly should you respond to your clients inquiries? The short answer is… right away.

The long answer is… you respond to your clients emails, texts, phone calls, right away.

It’s hard to imagine that there are “working” freelancers who think responding days later, or not checking their spam regularly is a winning strategy. They say they are too busy, or maybe they don’t want clients to think they are desperate. This ain’t “Swingers” and clients aren’t going to care if you are desperate when they find themselves in a bind and need someone to respond yesterday. If you are so busy you should have the resources to hire an assistant or an intern to field calls while you are busy “handling more important issues” (SMH).

Another excuse that I hear allot from “freelancers” is that they are night owls that don’t work the normal 9-5 schedule. Yeah it’s really cool to be working while the city is asleep, feeling like you are getting a leg up on the rest of us suckers who are in bed resting up for the next day’s tasks. I agree that working at night is a great time to work. There is something magical about working under dimmed lights, with your favorite music on, relative quiet on the streets, no phones, emails, texts lighting up your electronic hubs, especially in a city like New York where it’s hard to get away from the seemingly endless energy. The fact is, this is just another excuse. Most people find it tougher to wake up than to stay up. So they get into this pattern. But if you are going to sleep when the rest of us “suckers” are waking up, you are a step behind.  And btw, there are allot of folks who are night owls who still manage to get up early on a regular basis. So there is also that.

The bottom line is when it comes to responding to edit request, job proposals, emergency issues, it helps to be as responsive and timely as possible.

Trevz – TVG


19
Feb 13

We Are All Videographers – Q&A With Justin Little

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WAAV is experiencing a Little renaissance

“If in the moment, you are compelled to bypass the photo setting on your camera and capture the moment in motion, it is in that moment that you have chosen to be a videographer. If you take it a step further and choose to share that video with your friends, then you my friend are a storyteller” TVG

Living in South Williamsburg since 2008, by way of New Jersey, Justin Little came to New York to pursue a career in everything. He graduated with a degree in multi-media from The Philadelphia Art Institute of Technology, and makes a living as a lead developer at an award winning media company in Chelsea. When he isn’t working at his day job, lets just say Justin is doing a little bit of everything else. For starters his blog blaqbook.com was launched on the advice of one of his professors, who noticed his black book (filled various mediums of artistic expression) could use a bigger platform. He also finds time to throw music showcases, deejay, and edit.  Oh and I think I noticed that he was throwing up some Deejay mixes on Facebook the other day (Oh I remember the days when The New Pop use to be everywhere just like Justin). In between two DJ gigs, and a lunch date with Loudone a writer with the Look Out Crew. Justin was kind enough to stop by my studio to take part in a Little Q&A. (I’m so clever with my play on words).

How long have you been shooting?
2002 I borrowed my friends camera and just started filming any and everything. Like Mr.Brainwash style.

What is your primary camera?
Kodak zi8. Hear me out. It’s small, it’s very cheap, and has the capability to shoot 60fps in HD and was $100 a camera at the time. The microphone is good but not amazing so I use a Rode mic when needed. I also have a little Sima light I use when I’m shooting outside at night.

What is your favorite city to shoot in and why?
NYC hands down. It’s any and everything. You can successfully shoot whatever you want at any given time. I’m into music, street wear boutiques, great food, and dope women. No brainer. Definitely here.

If you had one historical event or figure you could shoot or interview, who would it be?
I could be cliche as fuck and say Biggie. That’s too easy. Historical? I mean yesterday is pretty much history right? If that is the case I would of loved to be the peer mediator for the band The Rapture before Mattie Safer left. I don’t mean to be a dick to the new bassist. He is good as well but it’s just not the same. I still like them. I caught their Webster Hall show for “In the Grace of His Love”. It was good and all but I feel like that original four piece’s potential was out of this world. Check them out before Mattie left.

If you’re talking historical events that is a no brainer. All of my friends are hippy babies. I’m a rasta baby. We go hand and hand. My mom would wake me and my siblings up every morning bumping soul. I grew up hearing endless stories and watching endless films of the greatest moment in the history of mankind. Hippies, Rastas, Soul… WOODSTOCK 69 man!

What do you love most about videography?
Having the power to show someone what you see how you see it. That is my shooting style for the most part. If I’m watching a band I move to make it interesting. But I originally started this to let my suburban friends see things the way I see them. It’s hard to capture a feeling. But between the camera and editing I get the chance to rebuild my reality for them.

What college did you attend and what was your major?
The Art Institute of Philadelphia. I have a Bachelors of Science in Multimedia and Web design. I pretty much studied everything that goes onto the internet. So video, audio, photography, 3d, business of the web, and programming. The thing with a school like AIPH, is you really don’t have to focus on one thing. I’m kind of all of all over the place. I need to know how to do all aspects of the things I’m interested in to an extent.

It worked out perfect. I don’t have time to wait for someone else. I have a 9 to 5, own and run blaqbook, contribute to freewilliamsburg.com, film and edit, throw music showcases, and DJ. There isn’t much in between time. So I need to be able to do everything on the fly and on the move.

What is your other passion? 
Passion? Wow! That is a question right there. I’m into so many things. But I’d have to say DJing right now. Funny story. Me and my boy Layton (drummer in The Courtesy Tier) went to Converse Rubber Tracks over at The Music Hall of Williamsburg for the Fools Gold 5th anniversary party. This was in November. Atrak was killing it, to say the least. When we were leaving we both decided that moment we were going to start DJing.

By Decemeber 15th we both had all of our gear and were spinning our first party. I set the bar pretty high. My goal is to DJ 50 times by the Summer. I’m about 9 gigs deep now.

Do you have a website? Oh yeah you already said blaqbook.com

Thank you Justin.


14
Feb 13

We Are All Videographers – Q&A with Ben Holbrook

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WAAV – Ben Holbrook see’s his art from both sides of the camera.

“Most videographers use the lens as a shield, or a battering ram, in which their expression becomes their extroverted alter-ego. Few videographers embrace the full picture, traversing both sides of the lens… As eager to explore as to be explored.” TVG

Ben moved to Bed-Stuy Brooklyn from Garner North Carolina in 2007 to pursue an acting career. He made a transition to writing as a way to better express himself as an actor. This blossomed into a full fledged passion for filmmaking and today videography. Ben assimilates all of these skills into a synergy of artistic expression. To each their own path. Ben dropped by the WAAV photo-booth and was kind enough to participate in a Q&A.

How long have you been shooting? 

I’ve been shooting since 2008, starting with my first short film, and branching out from there.

What is your primary camera?  

I use a Pentax K-01, which I love. I love Pentax’s color quality and their lenses, so I decided to try my hand at videography with their brand and I’ve liked it very much.

What is your favorite city to shoot in? 

New York, there’s just nothing better. I do, however, love shooting in Asheville, NC as well. It’s a gorgeous city with mountains and great culture (and food!).

What is your other passion?

I’m a playwright as well as a filmmaker, and an actor (BFA Acting ’07). I love writing, I do it every day. I also play music (guitar, vocals, and a bit of piano).

If you had one historical event or figure you could shoot or interview, who would it be? 

It would be great if someone could’ve been there to document the conversations in the room during the signing of the United States Constitution. Or being able to interview Black Elk or Chief Seattle, would be pretty special also.

What do you love most about videography?

Being able to give people access to an event or another human being in a way that they wouldn’t have in print or photography. They can see the person’s mannerisms, their expressions, hear their voice all at the same time. Or being able to take a person’s music and tell a visual story with it. It’s a fun way to create a little bit of reality and a fantastic way to tell a story.

Do you have a website?

Yes my website is http://benholbrook.com/ some of my stuff is there. And my facebook fan page is http://facebook.com/holbrookfilms a lot of my newer stuff is on there, like the music video I just shot (my first time doing a video).

Thank you Ben.

If you are interested in being a part of the WAAV project and you’re in the NYC area drop us an email.


13
Feb 13

Vine Vs. FrameBlast @ The Leica Soho Store Opening

Everyone has been talking about the new app Vine, described as a “video Instagram” that allows you to share 6-second looping video clips. They were recently acquired by twitter which contributed to the buzz.

Before I heard of Vine I heard of an app called FrameBlast another “video instagram” type app. Last night while shooting for Leica at The Leica Soho store opening I took some time to give FrameBlast a test run.  I embedded a youtube link below.  You can see the original FrameBlast post here.

I also gave Vine a test run at the same event. I embedded a youtube link below, you can see the original Vine link here.

Though both have their downsides, sharing limitations, limited audience, in my opinion FameBlast is the better of the two.  Yes, Vine has a much larger audience (I don’t mean to understate this fact) due mostly to the Twitter affiliation, but doesn’t offer much else. However FrameBlast offers filters, edit styles, soundtracks, landscape orientation, among other things. None of which Vine offers.

When it comes to the videos that I have been seeing produced on both platforms, the best analogy I can give is that Vine is to Youtube as Frameblast is to Vimeo.  I will get more into these applications in Episode 2 of The Videographers Guide.

Trevz


11
Feb 13

We Are All Videographers – Q&A with Julia Richter

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WAAV – Julia Richter takes a peek.

“You approach your new-found passion with a healthy dose of trepidation and doubt. Anxious to unveil the world of wonder that lies behind that little red button.” – TVG

Julia moved to Harlem from Budapest Hungary 6 months ago to study clinical psychology at Columbia. Photography is her hobby and she recently started looking to expand those interests into the video realm. Julia dropped by the photo-booth with her Canon in hand and gave us a peek into her new found passion. She is the prototypical artist in the WAAV portrait series.

How long have you been shooting? 

I mostly do photography, I have just recently started thinking in motion pictures.

What is your primary camera?  

It’s a Canon 40D.

What is your other passion?

Being on the road, traveling.

What is your favorite city to shoot in? 

Havana. It is a breathtaking city, full of stories, culture, mystery and passion.

If you had one historical event or figure you could shoot or interview, who would it be? 

I would document some group sessions of Muhammad, Moses and Jesus in a therapy room. I guess it would probably get a few views on youtube.

What do you love most about videography?

I love rhythms, it is basically what I am missing working with still pictures. Videography gives you the same freedom as photography, but adds all these other modalities to play with.

Do you have a video website yet?

Not Yet.

Thank you Julia.

If you are interested in being a part of the WAAV project and you’re in the NYC area drop us an email.


08
Feb 13

We Are All Videographers – Carla

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07
Feb 13

Setting Up Shop

I’ve lived in the same South Williamsburg apartment for almost 8 years and have always entertained the idea of making it into a photo studio, but I needed an idea to motivate me into action. Enter the “We Are All Videographers” portrait series. Up until now, all the photos that I have published for this series were repurposed from the “Portraits For A Pledge” series I shot this past summer. They were shot outdoors with natural light and the space I needed to get the right angles.  I dug the way those photos turned out, but wasn’t quite sure if I could duplicate it in my apartment. So I took to task, invited my friend Julia to be subject number one, and to my surprise there was enough space, and just enough natural light (with the aid of a flash) to duplicate the same look and feel of the photos I took outdoors.

My hope is to document videographers from all walks of life, from every level of production, in a democratized set up that features them as the every-man/modern-day storyteller. It took me two days to set up shop, and yesterday I did my first shoot. I will start rolling out the new photos next week.

If you would like to be featured in this series, and you are in the NYC area, email me at thevguide

TreVz

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06
Feb 13

We Are All Videographers – Vanessa

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05
Feb 13

We Are All Videographers – Barry

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